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Evansville, Indiana
October 14, 1994     The Message
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October 14, 1994
 

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F__, S SAGF__" ---- k { ' ,:i : : ii:i !I:, :(: !i! 00ii: the Old Cathedral Heritage Project awarded Lilly grant for $50,000 By PAUL R. LEINGANG Message editor Peakers say communication is the to deal with religious tensions WOODEN and women who have taken "Some people think their ac- the Vatican-released sum- Service 00ITy (CNS) _ alogue and a of conse- to deal- ern tensions in members of vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. With more than 100 synod participants making speeches the first week, topics ranged from the meaning of the vows to the wearing of religious habits. Midway through the synod, members were to gather in small groups to formulate pro- posals for Pope John Paul II, who was present for most of the speeches and is expected to write a post-synod document based on the proposals. The responsibility of bishops to guarantee that all church members are working for the good of the church and the world led two U.S. bishops to call for action when religious publicly oppose church teaching. Bishop James C. Timlin of Scranton, Pa., told the synod the church must leave room for diversity in consecrated life, but also be clear in what it ex- pects of religious. "The Gospel for religious in the Catholic Church is the Gospel as taught by the church," he said. tions are clothed in Gospel val- ues or Gospel freedom when they withdraw from eucharis- tic life or are absorbed in ex- treme feminism or when they publicly question magisterial teaching," the bishop said. "How can one claim to be a loyal son or daughter of the church and not participate in the Mass?" Bishop Timlin asked. =How can one be a Catholic in good standing and take positions in opposition to the teachings of the church?" Cardinal James A. Hickey of Washington asked religious to strengthen their commitment to ensuring respect for human life at all stages. "While we rejoice that indi- vidual religious and others in consecrated life have become active in pro-life work," he said, many congregations have not committed themselves col- lectively to the effort. "For example, in some con- gregations which actively ad- vocate 'justice and peace' is- sues, it is not always clear whether 'justice' begins at con- ception or only at birth," said Lilly Endowment Inc. has awarded a grant of $50,000 to the Diocese of Evansville to help preserve items of religious and historic significance in Vincennes. Access to items-for scholars and for the general public is also part of the overall plan to be de- veloped with the aid of the grant, for what is called "The Old Cathedral Heritage Project." The Basilica of St. Francis Xavier (the "Old Cathedral") is the oldest Catholic parish in the Diocese and in Indiana. Adjoin- ing the church building is the Brute Museum and Library, which contains thousands of doc- uments, books and other items relating to the history of the Old Northwest Territory. A Lilly Endowment grant made possible the construction of the current library and mu- mary of his talk. Sulpician Father Gerald L. Brown, president of the U.S. Conference of Major Superi- ors of Men,told Catholic News Service that disloyalty to church teaching and prac- tice =is not my experience of women religious in the United States." "You do hear rumors  about such attitudes, but women religious overall =are carrying the burden of much of the church's ministry," Fa- ther Brown said. "Tensions are inevitable in an era like ours when there is rapid change in almost every aspect of societal and ecclesial life," Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin of Chicago told the synod. But by "seeking the truth together, in mutual respect and charity, there is strong hope for the achievement of deeper communion," he said. "Respectful dialogue and prayerful discernment" are needed to sort out what is au- thentic amid the diversity in consecrated life, he said. religious ex.. rirnent, will Initially as Fa, master Ominicans, of reli- and in min- tensions Orders and be. and church said dur- of the Oct. 2- along and experts men's reli- and secular Ising the world of atholic men seum building. Holy Names Sister Louise Bond, diocesan chancellor, said the new grant will make it possible to plan for further efforts to protect and restore the materials while making more of the items available for scholarly research and public access. Cooperation with the U.S. National Park Service is also part of the long range planning process. Development of'the "Old Cathedral Complex" would be done in cooperation with the George Rogers Clark National Historical Park, adja- cent to the complex. "This project when fully im- plemented will trace Indiana's religious heritage and raise the level of public awareness of the contribution of Catholicism to American society," according to Sister Bond. "In this context, the project will also enhance the significance of the adjacent George Rogers Clark National Historical Park and heighten interest in the City of Vin- cennes," she stated. "Further, the project will preserve and make available invaluable Catholic Records and reference materials for re- search and intellectual access," the chancellor said "Such records will be preserved within a historical context."