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Evansville, Indiana
June 28, 1991     The Message
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June 28, 1991
 

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10 The Message -- for Catholics of Southwestern Indiana Magic of Words June 28, 1991 By FATHER JOSEPH L. ZILIAK Associate Publisher The quincentennial of the discovery of the Americas by Christopher Columbus part two. This week we'll share some insights from a woman from Lima, Peru, and a native American bishop from Gallup, New Mexico, as we place on your idea-table some food for thought for the year 1992. Dr. Carmen Lora de Ames, PhD., calls the quincentennial year a "debatable celebration." Instead, she would like to see the year as a year to "celebrate faith." "Columbus' coming was an invasion" of our land, continued Lora de Ames, who serves as di- rector of the Center for Studies and Publications in Lima. "This is what we call the underside of history. Colonialism is still with us in our coun- try." She noted that the arrival of the Spanish is a fact that cannot be denied. But she questioned the positive effects of their arrival. According to her, the population in the Americas in 1492 was 58 million people. By 1590 the number was reduced to nine million and only 50 years later the population was fur- ther reduced to one million. Why such a drastic reduction in population? "Horrible conditions and demands of work, war Quincentennial year:/00 time for reconciliation and healing and violence," she said. "We have learned from the Gulf War that the Third World doesn't .count anymore," she contin- ued. "We are a strong people. We have learned to accept the Gospel even while living in oppressive circumstances. "One of the most important theological prob- lems is to learn to incarnate the Gospel in differ- ent cultures," said Lora de Ames. "Continue to work on defending human dignity. Our major task is conversion. Let that be the slogan for the centu- ry." The nation's first native American bishop is Donald E. Pelotte, bishop of Gallup, New Mexico. "We need to focus on reconciliation and healing" during this quincentennial time, he said. "We will hold listening sessions in our diocese to allow the people to tell their own stories. Somehow we will attempt, then, to ritualize those stories." He noted that many of the 200,000 Navajos live without running water and electricity. Em- ployment is at 70 percent. The National Council of Churches "discussed whether the 500 year anniversary should be a pe- riod of mourning for misdeeds" rather than a cele- bration of discovery. "We need to bring the earth to an integrated part of our life," continued Bishop Pelotte. "We need to find our awn solutions. We need to learn to trust ourselves. I will encourage participation in a positive way. We must discover our own gifts. The quincentennial may be for us a moment of self-discovery." The positions and insights of each of these five speakers are valid and worthy of attention. Once again, we discover that people perceive is- sues, history and events from widely varying posi- tions. Their own history, experience, and culture play major roles. To celebrate the discovery of the Americas by Christopher Columbus in 1492 as though it is a recognized triumph of good over evil is naive and insensitive to millions of our fellow United States citizens. It is quite un-historical when we realize the cultures destroyed in the lands of those south of our border. Our remembrance of 500 years may well hold its greatest value in an increased knowledge of our own Western Hemisphere -- north and south -- and the richness of the cultures and history of all of our people. Then, only, may we glory in the faith and trust in God to continue to guide us and walk with us. J A parish outing Catechists, parents and children from the Sunday School program at All Saints Church, Can- nelburg, spent a day at Holiday World June 3. Above, from left, Jeff Thombleson, Shaun Thombleson, Theresa Miller, catechist, and Don Lahay, parish administrator, wait their turn for a ride. JASPER SERVICE AND SHOPPING GUIDE Buehlers I.G.A. "THE THRIFTY HOUSEWIFE'S SOURCE OF SAVINGS" QUALITY FOODS and MEATS Abo Humllbmll  Oddd Clqt KREMPP LUMBER CO. WHOLESALE BUILDING MATERIAL DISTRIBUTION & GENERAL CONTRACTING YARD CONSTRUCTION 4fl2-1961 482-6838 JASPER BECHER & KI.UESNER FUNERAL HOME Downtown , 214 E. 7th North 011!'* Newton IIIIIII SUBSCRIBE TO THE MESSAGE JASPER LUMBER CO. COMPLETE BUILDING SERVICE I 41et-il2S FIT. 4, JASPER Award recipients Brownies from St. Theresa Church, Evansville, who received the Child of God Catholic Scouting award are, front row, left, Abbie Boyles, Shelly McFall, Andrea Payne, back row, left, Francine Ruper, Jamie Ford, Alia Tawil and Katie Barr. Alyene Ruffert is their Brownie leader. Funeral Homes , .. Four ZIEMER-SHEARS Convenient Locations EAST CHAPEL 800 S. HEBRON AVE. 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