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January 8, 1988     The Message
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CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF EVANSVILLE VOLUME 18 NUMBER 18 JANUARY 8, 1988 Audience with the pope Father David Fleck, Vocations Director for the Diocese of Evansville, center, and Evansville Theology student Eric Russ met with Pope John Paul U during Thanksgiving week this past fall. Father Fleck had been visiting Russ, who is studying at /0rth American College in Rome, when the invitation came from the Vatican for the audience with the pope. Russ, a native of Ferdinand, Ind., is a II Theology student preparing for the priesthood for the Diocese of Evansville. Photo by Arturo Mari, L'OSSERVATORE ROMANO 1987 Sister Blandford elected abbess Sister Mary Martha Blandford, O.S.C., was elected Jan. 5 as Abbess at the Monastery of St. Clare, Evansville. She was elected to a three-year term in the 19-member community, succeeding three term Abbess Sister Anna Scheessele. Sister Dorothy Kopetsky, O.S.C., was elected Vicaress. Elected as Counselors were Sister Anna Scheessele, O.S.C., Sister Mary Joseph Higdon, O.S.C., and Sister Mary Francis .Lindenschmidt, O.S.C.. The abbess is responsible for the spiritual and material welfare of the community. The vicaress is second in charge. "I want to be a servant of the sisters, to lead them in spiritual life." said the new abbess. "My duty is really just to be there for them, to lead them closer to the Lord." She added, "I trust the Lord will lead me." Sister Blandford is the daughter of Edward and Loretta Josephine Bland- ford, who live in Tell City, Ind. She entered the monastery Nov. 25, 1944; she made her first profession Mar. 13, 1947, and her solemn profession December 13, 1950, as a member of the Order of St. Clare, Second Order of St Francis. Sister Blandford says she trusts the Lord will send new members to the community, which at one time in the 1950s numbered 49. One new member will be received Sunday, Jan. 10, bfin'g: ins to 20 the total of women religious at the monastery. Pope's visit to the U.S. was highlight of year in religion By JERRY FILTEAU His frontal attack on dissent from the NC News Service church's magisterium, or teaching WASHINGTON (NC} -- For many U.S. Catholics the major religious event of 1987 was Pope John Paul II's U.S. trip Sept. 10-19. The pope urged American Catholics to uphold religious values in a secularized culture, develop a deeper prayer life and spirituality and promote priestly and religious vocations. He called on them to strengthen family life, adhere to church teachings and open .their hearts to the poor and suffering at ome and abroad. authority, at his,meeting with the na- tion's bishops in Los Angeles drew front-page headlines across the country. It is "a grave error," he said, to hold "that dissent from the magisterium is totally compatible with being a 'good Catholic' and poses no obstacle to reception of the sacraments." Visiting nine U.S. cities -- Miami; Columbia, S.C.; New Orleans; San An- tonio, Texas; Phoenix, Ariz.; Los Angeles, Monterey and San Francisco in California; and Detroit -- the pope met with priests, Religious, lay leaders, bishops, deacons, young people, educators, and health care and social workers. He had special meetings with black Catholics, native Americans and Polish Americans. He spoke in Spanish several times to large audiences of Hispanic Catholics. He also met with President Reagan, American Jewish leaders, represen- tatives of Non-Catholic Christian churches, and representatives of non- Christian religions. RELIGION WAS IN the news in 1987 in many other ways as well. Mother Teresa to speak in Louisville Mother Teresa of Calcutta is schedul- ed as the featured speaker of The Church Teaches Forum, in Louisville, Ky., according to an announcement from the sponsors of the event. Mother Teresa is the internationally known Founder and Mother General of Missionaries of Charity. Among the honors she has received are the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979, the Medal of -Freedom awarded by President Ronald Reagan in 1985 and the Pope John XXIII Peace Prize awarded by Pope Paul VI in .... 1971. Since Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity four decades ago, some 3000 sisters and 400 brothers have joined the order, working at 350 locations in 71 countries. The Church Teaches Forum is jointly sponsored by Catholics United for the Faith and the Cardinal Mindszenty Foundation. It is scheduled June 18, at the Commonwealth Convention Center, Louisville, Ky. Area Coordinator for the forum is John Payne of Evansville. Payne said he received word of Mother Teresa!s scheduled appearance earlier this week. Payne is beginning efforts to coor- dinate transportation for members of religious communities within the Evansville diocese who want to attend the Forum. He said he also hopes to solicit donations to pay for their transportation and meal expenses. Payne said people in the Vincennes area should contact Richard Vieck for more information about the Forum, and efforts to coordinate local participation. On the world scene, Central 'American conflicts, South African apar- theid, Soviet oppression of religious ac- tivists and the U.S.-Soviet summit to eliminate short- and medium-range nuclear missiles in Europe were objects of concern and involvement by religious leaders. Religious leaders praised the December meeting of President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev as the two world leaders signed the nuclear reduction pact and explored possibilities of reaching a similar agree- ment on long-range strategic weapons. The treaty -- which still needs to be ratified by legislative bodies in the two countries -- followed one of the basic nuclear deterrence principles enun- ciated by Pope John Paul and the U.S. Catholic bishops, that deterrence is morally acceptable not as an end in itself but only as part of a process aimed at reduction and eventual elimination of nuclear weapons. In Central America, new hopes for peace were raised in August. as Costa Rican President Oscar Arias led the heads of the region's countries to agree- ment on a peace plan. Arias received the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. Following the agreement, Arch- bishop Arturo Rivera Dumas of San Salvador, E1 Salvador, mediated peace talks between the government and rebel forces in his country, and Nicaraguan Cardinal Miguel Obando Bravo was named to head reconciliation efforts be- tween the Sandinista government and "contra" guerrillas of Nicaragua. 8 1987page 14 CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF EVANSVILLE VOLUME 18 NUMBER 18 JANUARY 8, 1988 Audience with the pope Father David Fleck, Vocations Director for the Diocese of Evansville, center, and Evansville Theology student Eric Russ met with Pope John Paul U during Thanksgiving week this past fall. Father Fleck had been visiting Russ, who is studying at /0rth American College in Rome, when the invitation came from the Vatican for the audience with the pope. Russ, a native of Ferdinand, Ind., is a II Theology student preparing for the priesthood for the Diocese of Evansville. Photo by Arturo Mari, L'OSSERVATORE ROMANO 1987 Sister Blandford elected abbess Sister Mary Martha Blandford, O.S.C., was elected Jan. 5 as Abbess at the Monastery of St. Clare, Evansville. She was elected to a three-year term in the 19-member community, succeeding three term Abbess Sister Anna Scheessele. Sister Dorothy Kopetsky, O.S.C., was elected Vicaress. Elected as Counselors were Sister Anna Scheessele, O.S.C., Sister Mary Joseph Higdon, O.S.C., and Sister Mary Francis .Lindenschmidt, O.S.C.. The abbess is responsible for the spiritual and material welfare of the community. The vicaress is second in charge. "I want to be a servant of the sisters, to lead them in spiritual life." said the new abbess. "My duty is really just to be there for them, to lead them closer to the Lord." She added, "I trust the Lord will lead me." Sister Blandford is the daughter of Edward and Loretta Josephine Bland- ford, who live in Tell City, Ind. She entered the monastery Nov. 25, 1944; she made her first profession Mar. 13, 1947, and her solemn profession December 13, 1950, as a member of the Order of St. Clare, Second Order of St Francis. Sister Blandford says she trusts the Lord will send new members to the community, which at one time in the 1950s numbered 49. One new member will be received Sunday, Jan. 10, bfin'g: ins to 20 the total of women religious at the monastery. Pope's visit to the U.S. was highlight of year in religion By JERRY FILTEAU His frontal attack on dissent from the NC News Service church's magisterium, or teaching WASHINGTON (NC} -- For many U.S. Catholics the major religious event of 1987 was Pope John Paul II's U.S. trip Sept. 10-19. The pope urged American Catholics to uphold religious values in a secularized culture, develop a deeper prayer life and spirituality and promote priestly and religious vocations. He called on them to strengthen family life, adhere to church teachings and open .their hearts to the poor and suffering at ome and abroad. authority, at his,meeting with the na- tion's bishops in Los Angeles drew front-page headlines across the country. It is "a grave error," he said, to hold "that dissent from the magisterium is totally compatible with being a 'good Catholic' and poses no obstacle to reception of the sacraments." Visiting nine U.S. cities -- Miami; Columbia, S.C.; New Orleans; San An- tonio, Texas; Phoenix, Ariz.; Los Angeles, Monterey and San Francisco in California; and Detroit -- the pope met with priests, Religious, lay leaders, bishops, deacons, young people, educators, and health care and social workers. He had special meetings with black Catholics, native Americans and Polish Americans. He spoke in Spanish several times to large audiences of Hispanic Catholics. He also met with President Reagan, American Jewish leaders, represen- tatives of Non-Catholic Christian churches, and representatives of non- Christian religions. RELIGION WAS IN the news in 1987 in many other ways as well. Mother Teresa to speak in Louisville Mother Teresa of Calcutta is schedul- ed as the featured speaker of The Church Teaches Forum, in Louisville, Ky., according to an announcement from the sponsors of the event. Mother Teresa is the internationally known Founder and Mother General of Missionaries of Charity. Among the honors she has received are the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979, the Medal of -Freedom awarded by President Ronald Reagan in 1985 and the Pope John XXIII Peace Prize awarded by Pope Paul VI in .... 1971. Since Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity four decades ago, some 3000 sisters and 400 brothers have joined the order, working at 350 locations in 71 countries. The Church Teaches Forum is jointly sponsored by Catholics United for the Faith and the Cardinal Mindszenty Foundation. It is scheduled June 18, at the Commonwealth Convention Center, Louisville, Ky. Area Coordinator for the forum is John Payne of Evansville. Payne said he received word of Mother Teresa!s scheduled appearance earlier this week. Payne is beginning efforts to coor- dinate transportation for members of religious communities within the Evansville diocese who want to attend the Forum. He said he also hopes to solicit donations to pay for their transportation and meal expenses. Payne said people in the Vincennes area should contact Richard Vieck for more information about the Forum, and efforts to coordinate local participation. On the world scene, Central 'American conflicts, South African apar- theid, Soviet oppression of religious ac- tivists and the U.S.-Soviet summit to eliminate short- and medium-range nuclear missiles in Europe were objects of concern and involvement by religious leaders. Religious leaders praised the December meeting of President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev as the two world leaders signed the nuclear reduction pact and explored possibilities of reaching a similar agree- ment on long-range strategic weapons. The treaty -- which still needs to be ratified by legislative bodies in the two countries -- followed one of the basic nuclear deterrence principles enun- ciated by Pope John Paul and the U.S. Catholic bishops, that deterrence is morally acceptable not as an end in itself but only as part of a process aimed at reduction and eventual elimination of nuclear weapons. In Central America, new hopes for peace were raised in August. as Costa Rican President Oscar Arias led the heads of the region's countries to agree- ment on a peace plan. Arias received the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. Following the agreement, Arch- bishop Arturo Rivera Dumas of San Salvador, E1 Salvador, mediated peace talks between the government and rebel forces in his country, and Nicaraguan Cardinal Miguel Obando Bravo was named to head reconciliation efforts be- tween the Sandinista government and "contra" guerrillas of Nicaragua. 8 1987page 14